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BLC Blog 2017-06-12T21:31:21+00:00

Interview with Randall Buth

By | October 31st, 2014|Categories: Blog, Greek immersion, Greek pedagogy, Hebrew alive, Hebrew as second language, Koine Greek, Koine pronunciation, Living Koine, modern Hebrew, reading biblical languages, Uncategorized|

These are answers to an online interview with Seumas Macdonald. 1. Randall, I wonder if you'd share a little about the environment and methods you were exposed to when first learning the biblical languages yourself? [...]

More on Why Jesus was a Hebrew speaker

By | June 20th, 2014|Categories: ancient Greek, Aramaic, Biblical Hebrew, Blog, Dead Sea Scrolls, Galilee, Gospel of John, Hebrew alive, Hebrew in First Century, Koine Greek, Mishnaic Hebrew, New Testament, NT textual criticism, synoptic gospels, ἑβραιστί|

I appreciated the title of a recent essay (June 9, 2014) by Seth Sanders on Religion Dispatches entitled, “Why the Argument Over Jesus’ Language is More Complicated and More Interesting Than Media Experts Have Claimed.” [...]

Differentiating Hebrew and Aramaic Backgrounds in Greek writings

By | May 5th, 2014|Categories: Aramaic, Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew verb, Blog, Dead Sea Scrolls, Gospel of John, Greek word order, Greek word order, Hebrew in First Century, Mishnaic Hebrew, New Testament, Pseudepigrapha, synoptic gospels, Syriac, ἑβραιστί, ἐγένετο, ευθυς, τότε|

Semitic influence on an ancient Greek writing has been discussed widely in Biblical Studies and Pseudepigraphical texts. In general, it is quite difficult to go deeper and to differentiate between Hebrew influence and Aramaic influence [...]

Did Jesus Heal the Sick before or after the Sabbath Had Ended? (Luke 4:40; Mark 1:32; Matt. 8:16)

By | April 28th, 2014|Categories: ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew verb, Blog, Hebrew in First Century, reading biblical languages, synoptic gospels|

A little story begins in Luke 4:40 after the healing of Peter’s mother-in-law (Luke 4:38-39): Δύνοντος δὲ τοῦ ἡλίου ἅπαντες ὅσοι εἶχον ἀσθενοῦντας νόσοις ποικίλοις ἤγαγον αὐτοὺς πρὸς αὐτόν· ὁ δὲ ἑνὶ ἑκάστῳ αὐτῶν τὰς [...]

The Language Background and Literary Function of the Cry from the Cross Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34

By | April 17th, 2014|Categories: ancient Greek, Aramaic, Biblical Hebrew, Blog, Galilee, Hebrew in First Century, New Testament, NT textual criticism, synoptic gospels, ἑβραιστί|

We are finally able to provide the published text of the article on the "cry of dereliction" from the Brill volume, The Language Environment of First Century Judaea,  Randall Buth and R Steven Notley edd., [...]

So what, in fact, does ἑβραϊστί mean?

By | April 17th, 2014|Categories: ancient Greek, Aramaic, Biblical Hebrew, Blog, Gospel of John, Hebrew as second language, Hebrew in First Century, Koine Greek, New Testament, ἑβραιστί|

A rather lengthy article "Hebraisti in Ancient Texts: Does ἑβραϊστί Ever Mean 'Aramaic'?" by Randall Buth and Chad Pierce has appeared in the Brill volume, The Language Environment of First Century Judaea,  Randall Buth and [...]

New Volume on First Century Language in Land of Israel

By | April 17th, 2014|Categories: ancient Greek, Blog, Gospel of John, Hebrew alive, Hebrew in First Century, Koine Greek, New Testament, NT textual criticism, reading biblical languages, synoptic gospels|

The Language Environment of First-Century Judaea, edited by Randall Buth and R. Steven Notley, (Brill, 2014, ISBN 9789004263406) has finally appeared. Here is a PDF of the table of contents and preliminary chapter "Introduction: Language [...]

Word Order, Focus-CC (Contextualizing Constituent, Topic) Inversion, Enclitics in Greek

By | December 16th, 2013|Categories: Biblical Hebrew, biblical language fluency, Blog, Contextualizing Constituent, enclitic, Greek accents, Greek pedagogy, Greek word order, Koine Greek, Koine pronunciation, Living Koine, quiet spot tracking, reading biblical languages|

While reading Philemon this morning I noticed what might be considered an inversion of Focus--Contextualizing Constituent (aka Topic) in the pre-verb area. The default order with two marked items, a CC and Focus, is normally [...]